Green Acres Village: Q&A

What’s an ecovillage? What’s cohousing?

An ecovillage is a type of intentional community with a particular focus on sustainability. There are hundreds of ecovillages around the world, with new ones forming every day.

Cohousing is a form of intentional community that balances the need for privacy with the need for community, generally by structuring private residences around a shared “common house.”

Our community combines elements of ecovillages and cohousing communities.

Where the heck is Green Acres?

Green Acres is the neighborhood just east of the IU Bloomington campus. Our boundaries are Union Street on the west, the Bypass on the east, 10th Street on the north, and 3rd Street on the south.

Can I get involved even if I don’t live in Green Acres?

We would love that! The best way to get involved is to start coming to our gatherings. To stay informed about our events, join our email list by sending a blank email to: green-acres-neighborhood-ecovillage+subscribe@googlegroups.com.

Are older folks welcome in the ecovillage? Are IU students?

Yes! We welcome folks of all ages who are attracted to our vision, whether singles, couples, or families with kids.

Is there a membership process?

For those that wish to make a deeper commitment and be involved in our decision-making, we do have a membership process, but you don’t need to be a member to attend most of our events. If you do choose to become more involved, and want to make an official commitment to GANE, learn about joining us.

Why create an ecovillage? What’s the point?

The triple crises of peak oil, climate change, and economic recession (or depression) necessitate new ways of thinking and living so that individuals and communities can thrive in the coming decades. To learn more, we recommend the following books:

Why create an ecovillage? What’s the point?

The triple crises of peak oil, climate change, and economic recession (or depression) necessitate new ways of thinking and living so that individuals and communities can thrive in the coming decades. To learn more, we recommend the following books:

§ Overshoot (William Catton)

§ The Long Emergency (James Kunstler)

§ Storms of My Grandchildren (James Hansen)

§ The Ascent of Humanity (Charles Eisenstein)

The End of Growth (Richard Heinberg)